Debt, Money Management, National Debt

Ask Chuck: The Bible, Money, and Love

By Chuck Bentley, Crown Financial Ministries

Dear Chuck,

I’m growing weary of our society’s overuse (and misuse) of the word love. I hear and see it in advertising, on social media, and in conversations. If the first and greatest commandment is to love the Lord our God, it appears we’ve confused our priorities. It appears we love money more than Him or His word.  

Love is in the Air 

Dear Love is in the Air, 

Thank you for the great question. I chose to answer your question so I could talk about love and money on Valentine’s Day. Did you know, Americans will spend an estimated $50 billion dollars on Valentine’s Day gifts and activities to show their love to a special loved one. My wife prefers that I save the money for chocolate or flowers on this day and show love throughout the year. 

Love and Money

You have identified a significant problem. When love becomes misunderstood or misdirected, we all suffer. Staggering debt levels, lack of savings, and rising stress suggest we have a spending problem and a heart problem. Even recently, experts have declared that when consumption turns into consumerism, it becomes a social disease

The enemy has convinced people that things will bring happiness. Yet, throughout Scripture, God warns us not to be led astray. He tells us:

  • Love God and others
  • Pursue love
  • Guard ourselves
  • Don’t love the world
  • Don’t love money
  • Life does not consist in the abundance of possessions

Just this week, the Wall Street Journal released information that hints at Americans’ disobedience and confused priorities. Credit card debt rose to record highs during the last quarter of 2019. Spurred by a seemingly strong economy and job market, spending increased dramatically. Unfortunately, the number of delinquent payments rose too. Consider this statistic cited in the article:

“Total credit card balances increased by $46 billion to $930 billion, well above the previous peak seen before the 2008 financial crisis, according to data released by the Federal Reserve Bank of New York on Tuesday.”

Debt brings stress and bondage. People are unable to live as God designed when they are strapped with debt. In today’s world that includes credit card debt, student loan debt, car loans, mortgages, personal and payday loans. It prevents many from saving money to be used as God directs. Bankrate’s recent poll shows only 41% of Americans could cover a $1,000 emergency with savings. 

The Apostle Paul wrote: “You will be enriched in every way to be generous in every way, which through us will produce thanksgiving to God.” (2 Corinthians 9:11 ESV)

There’s only one reason God supplies a surplus of wealth to a Christian: so that he or she will have enough to provide for the needs of others. True wealth comes with the responsibility of giving. God promises blessings to all who freely give and His curse on those who hoard, steal, covet, or idolize.

Giving is the foundation of a life lived in selfless devotion to others. It fulfills the second greatest commandment, to love our neighbor as ourselves. Preoccupation with things of this world gets us sidetracked. We lose sight of our final destination and the purpose for which God has us here. 

Billions of dollars dedicated to credit card spending confirms that we have confused our wants and needs. We have forgotten our neighbor and the Lord’s statement: “It is more blessed to give than to receive” (Acts 20:35 ESV)

When asked about the greatest commandment, Jesus answered: “..you shall love the Lord your God with all your heart and with all your soul and with all your mind and with all your strength.” (Mark 12: 30 ESV)

Divided hearts have divided priorities and those are evident in the way we handle money. That is why He teaches us in Hebrews 13:5 “Keep your lives free from the love of money and be content with what you have because God has said, ‘Never will I leave you; never will I forsake you.’” (NIV) Here is a simple test to know if you love God or money. How do you react when you lose money? Are you in a panic, upset or even angry? Remember, our hope is in God, not the money that he provides. Money will leave us; He will not.

Save Your Way Out of Debt

One way to reduce stress is through automatic saving. The Eli app is a tool that can improve your financial health so you can experience greater levels of freedom in your life. Check out the new Eli app to begin an automatic savings program to reduce your stress and increase your freedom to love God and others as you faithfully pay off your debt. 

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Credit, Credit Score

Test Your Knowledge: Take the Credit Score Quiz

Credit scores are important! A borrower with a low score could pay thousands more in interest over the life of a typical five-year car loan than a consumer with a high score. Past quiz results have indicated that many Americans could improve their credit score knowledge and ability to manage their scores.

How much do you really know about your credit score? How much is myth vs. fact?

To find out, click to take this anonymous 12-question quiz. It doesn’t take long, but the knowledge you gain could go a long way toward improving your own score.

About the Quiz

The Credit Score Quiz and accompanying website, creditscorequiz.org, are informational tools developed by the Consumer Federation of America and VantageScore. They developed the quiz and website to increase consumer knowledge about credit scores and how to improve them. Earlier this year, this quiz was administered to a representative sample of 1,000 adult Americans. The quiz results indicate that many Americans could improve their credit score knowledge and ability to manage their scores.

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Credit Score, Debt, Finance, Money Management

How Credit Score Can Affect Relationships

By NACCC

Personal finances are rarely discussed but often the biggest strain on a couple. Even in early courtships, a newly dating couple may fret over who will pay for dinner, or have different tastes in entertainment based on affordability. Topics such as careers, hobbies, and interests can easily spill into money talk. Money is just as important as other relationship issues such as family and personal interests.

Whether you’re spending your Valentine’s Day with a long-term partner or having a first date, a conversation about credit scores can provide valuable insight to be considered for relationship planning. Credit scores are always assigned to an individual, never a couple. But joint accounts can have an effect on those individual credit scores.

Credit Score Disparities Can Predict Future Relationship Problems

According to a report by the Federal Reserve, couples with similar credit scores are more likely to stay together, while those with a larger disparity are more likely to separate. Differing spending habits, opposing views on debt and other financial problems can cause stress on the relationship that those with similar credit scores are less likely to experience.

Examples of difficulties these couples may face could include:

  • Lingering debt from the past
  • Poor spending habits
  • Disparities in household financial contributions
  • Difficulty obtaining a mortgage or other important loan together
  • Hiding or avoiding spending, debt or other financial issues
  • Bills and expenses
  • General financial stress

Of course, we aren’t suggesting to dump your partner at the slightest score difference. But it’s important to communicate with each other about personal finance and plan appropriately. If a partner has a low credit score (or no credit), what steps can be taken to improve the score for the long-term? Relationships are about working together, and a partner with a higher score may be able to provide advice and suggestions to a partner with a lower score.

It Takes Trust, but a Low Score isn’t the End

If there is a large disparity in credit scores, both partners should evaluate whether they are prepared and willing to provide the support, communication, and shared responsibility required to fix the credit problem.

Committed couples can move forward with confidence by working together to build both of their credit scores. Two quick strategies for building credit include:

  • Having the partner with the higher credit score add the partner with the lower credit score as an authorized user on a credit card (this method requires a lot of trust!)
    • Remember, married couples do not share a credit score, but behavior in joint accounts can affect both partners’ scores.
  • Using a secured credit card to build credit

If one or both partners have debt, they should work together to develop a spending plan that leaves additional income to pay off the debt. For those in debt, paying off the debt is the best way to improve a credit score.

If one or both partners are struggling in their career, they can come up with a plan to support each other while working towards more prosperous career goals. Couples can turn a weak credit score into a strength by using it to incorporate accountability, good habits, and stronger trust in their relationship.

Conversation is Key

Overall, couples need to communicate about money to maintain a successful relationship. Just like with personal finance issues, avoiding the matter doesn’t solve problems or build wealth. Couples should discuss:

  • Existing debt
  • Joint accounts
  • Credit accounts
  • Spending habits (both good and bad)
  • Major purchases
  • Bills and household expenses

This leads couples towards better financial planning and spending habits as they move forward.

Couples can start with small discussions in the early stages, and then move on to larger discussions later. For example, a couple in the beginning stages of a relationship could discuss the cost of dinner, or compare the costs of phone, cable or utility bills. They may talk about debt or salary, but not go into the specifics or the numbers. Couples in more committed stages can begin more difficult conversations about existing debt, bank accounts, and long-term planning.

If a partner is unwilling to discuss finances or is quiet on the subject, the other partner can start small by mentioning their own personal finances and ask for thoughts and opinions.

At times, there will be misunderstandings and frustrations. Remember that no two people share the same financial education. Financial knowledge that may seem simple and obvious to one partner may be an entirely new concept to the other. Use money talk as a learning opportunity and a habit to build on stronger communication skills.

Everyone has different financial paths. When two paths join, they decide where to go next, together.

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