Car, Christian Credit Counselors, Credit, Credit Cards, Credit Counseling, Debit & Your Credit Score, Debt, Debt Settlement, Finance, Goals, Personal Goals, Saving

High Car Payments Can Drive You Over the Edge

car

High Car Payments

It is an all too common story. Many people struggling with debt can trace the beginning of their debt problems to a new car purchase – a big monthly payment, financed for too long. Some households even have two vehicles with large payments in the $400 to $500 range. With the budget maxed out, you can see how this type of financial burden could lead to a crisis. It’s easy to start falling behind on your budget and ultimately turning to credit cards, cash advances or loans to make up where your cash flow is lacking.

Test Drive the Monthly Payment

You may think you’re getting a steal of a deal on that new SUV or speedster. After all, the dealer said he’d take $2,000 off the sticker price – how could you pass that one up! You know the saying: Buyer beware. Be aware of what you can afford, and go into the purchase with a plan. Find a comfortable monthly payment that allows room in your budget for maintenance, and possible gas and insurance increases. You want a vehicle that improves your lifestyle, not one that enslaves you to a high monthly expense.

Car Payment Facts

  • Monthly payment

Financial experts recommend spending no more than 15% of your monthly take-home pay on a car payment. If your budget is tight, a more conservative figure like 8% would be appropriate. Even though a lender may approve you for more than you have budgeted, you don’t need to spend it. Consider the future effects of your decision and your other lifestyle and financial goals. Balance is key to budgeting.

  • Term of the loan

According to the Federal Reserve, the average auto loan term has been creeping up over the years. In 1998, the typical car loan was a 4-year term, and now, lenders commonly offer 6-year terms. It certainly lowers your monthly payment and may help you reach the 8% you budgeted for. However, it doesn’t come free of charge. Obviously, you’ll pay a lot more than you signed for because of the increase in overall interest. And, if you want or need to sell, chances are you’ll owe more than what the car is worth. It takes longer to build equity with a long-term loan. Consider what you can afford monthly and base a purchase on a four year loan. This doesn’t have to mean less car. Shopping used cars in your price range can offer a fleet of options.

  • Interest

Do some investigating and shop around for the best interest rate before negotiating a purchase with a dealer. Check other dealerships and financial institutions. Dealerships and financial institutions often run promotions, offering incentives like lower interest rates, zero down and cash back. Also, if you can afford to send in payments above your monthly payment, it will pay down your premium faster, save on the overall interest and shorten the life of your loan.

  • Pleasure

Don’t buy a vehicle that you don’t like or are embarrassed to drive. It is important that you are happy with your purchase for more reasons than simply the cost. The best car deal is one that you can afford, meets your lifestyle needs and that you enjoy driving.

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    Making Money Matters Manageable in Your Marriage

    Mutual Money Management moneymarriage

    Is it love or money that makes the world go round? It’s both…Make money work for your marriage, not against it.  You need tips on strengthening your marriage through mutual management of your money.  This can be done and can even be fun!  Keep reading to find out how.

    Financial Honesty

    Have open, honest and non-confrontational discussions about your finances.  Set aside a regular time to talk about where you are, where you want to be and how you will get there…together.

    Budgeting and Strategic Spending

    Make budgeting a positive and fun project, rather than a chore.  Don’t view a budget as a way to plan spending out of your life.  News Flash: While you are alive, you will never stop spending money.  And, the ultimate goal is not to spend less, but to spend strategically and find ways to increase your income to continue to meet your financial goals.  Plan in the things you want and enjoy and work together to achieve them.

    Money Habits

    Be aware of your spouses habits and tendencies when it comes to finances.  Don’t eye one another to find fault, but look for opportunities to step in and offer encouragement or a listening ear.  Fear can lead people to hold onto finances tightly, or spend impulsively.  Find ways to help build faith and trust into each other, and encouraging one another daily.

    Reward Sacrifice

    Regardless of the roles you’ve decided upon in the area of finance, you are both working towards your mutual goals.  Look for opportunities to reward your spouse for their hard work.  Have they been making personal sacrifices to stay within the budget?  Acknowledge that in a way that will tell him or her: Thank you. I love you. I’m proud of you. I’m glad we are on the same team.

    Learn from Financial Freedom

    Get around other couples who are walking in financial freedom and learn from them.  Look for couples who are seasoned and successful in the area of mutual finance, and allow them to mentor you as a couple. They have been where you are and have insight into your success.

    The Three L’s

    Love much. Live well. Laugh often.  Always remember the love you have for your spouse.  Keep that as a forethought, prizing it more highly than anything money can buy.

    Do you want to know more about debt and how you can make smart financial decisions now that will help you secure a more prosperous financial future? Sign up for our newsletter for monthly money tips.

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      Money, Love, and Marriage

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      Marriage and Money

      Roses are red; violets are blue. No matter the cost, I’ll stand by you…

      Have you had the talk yet?…You know, the one about money, spending habits, future goals, budgeting…?

      If you haven’t, it should be a top priority for your relationship.  If you have, have it again.  Discussing finances should be a regular and healthy part of your lifestyle together.  Being on the same page in this area will protect your marriage (or future marriage) against the most common relational enemy.  You’ve heard the statistics.  Money and finances are the number one reason couples argue and ultimately divorce. Don’t let your marriage become a number.

      Make Finances a Joint Venture

      Regardless of you or your spouses accounting or investment skill set, planning out your financial future and implementing those strategies should be a mutual effort.  Coming together to decide matters in the area of finance will allow you both to be on the same page number…of the same book.  Couples drift away from each other day by day when they are not planning their future together.

      Relationships and matters of finance should not be left to one person alone, even if he or she is “better at it.”  This disconnects one partner from a key area and anytime one of the partners is left out of a major area of the relationship, it will lead to the two of them planning and living, by default, two separate lives.  We, as humans, are meant to be in relationship with each other, and drifters will eventually wash up on someone else’s shore.  So, make it a priority to come together and stay together in the area of financial planning.

      Tip for Financial Success

      Use this time of planning as an opportunity to build closeness into your relationship.

      Respect and Love

      The two greatest relational needs. Anytime you are communicating with your spouse, you are communicating either respect and love or their opposites.  Since the topic of finance can stir one or both of you up, be especially careful to communicate this respect, love and trust through words, tone and body language.

      Listen and Speak Lovingly

      Listen for his or her dreams, desires, goals, reasons.  Your partner has spending habits, as we all do.  Find out the why behind the what.  This will help you to understand your partner better and offer support when needed.

      Be a voice of encouragement. Speak highly of and to your spouse.  Build him or her up with your words. Remind your better-half how capable, intelligent and valued he or she is.  You have the power to build up or to tear down, and it starts with a simple comment.

      Give Financial Grace

      If this is a new process for your relationship, a new way of doing things financially.  Give yourselves grace to get through the transition. Old habits may die hard, but building new and healthy patterns into your relationship is definitely worth the initial investment!

      Do you want to know more about debt and how you can make smart financial decisions now that will help you secure a more prosperous financial future? Sign up for our newsletter for monthly money tips.

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        Goals, Personal Goals

        Financial Goal Setting Reminders

        Productive Goal Setting

        We are already 3 weeks into the New Year, and we hope everyone is off to a great start! Since this month’s ‘theme’ is productive goal setting, we wanted to keep you on track by reminding you of a few things.

        Priority Goals

        should be short-term needs; priority two goals should be long-term needs. Short-term wants comprise the third priority, and long-term wants are priority four. In this way, you can address your highest priority financial goals first, and better focus your financial resources for the future.

        Write Your Goals

        Write them and put them somewhere they can be seen daily. Revisit your goals regularly, keeping in mind that as your budget changes, your goals might also. Share your goals with your family so you can stay motivated together as you reach for the financial goals you have set before you.

        An Encouraging Verse

        “I returned, and saw under the sun, that the race is not to the swift, nor the battle to the strong, neither yet bread to the wise, nor yet riches to men of understanding, nor yet favour to men of skill; but time and chance happeneth to them all.” Ecclesiastes 9:11

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          Setting Good Financial Goals

          S.M.A.R.T Financial Goals

          If you are keeping up with the Newsletters, you know that last week we decided to open up the New Year by presenting you with the “S.M.A.R.T.” tactic; a great tool that you can use as a guide when setting your goals for 2011

          The aim is to set good financial goals.  You will want to write them down, consolidate and refine them, prioritize them, make them measurable, and keep them visible.  Set good goals and keep them in front of you—you’ll be surprised at how much more productive and focused you’ll feel as you start living with a clearer purpose.

          The second common denominator of all good financial plans is a spending plan (i.e., budget). You may not like it, but it’s an absolutely essential tool for everyone.  Without a spending plan, you cannot implement saving and investing strategies because you don’t know if you have any extra money to save or invest.

          Keep an eye out for next week’s newsletter about priorities!

          Financial GoalsTip

          Don’t procrastinate!  Just sit down and get started.  It does not have to be perfect, nor does it need to be complete.  You will find things along the way that will need to be added and/or changed; that is ok. The most important thing is that you make a set PLAN.

          “Failing to plan, is planning to fail.”

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